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Child adoption answers (1782)

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Q: 

child ABANDONMENT

A: Hi Tina, one of the requirements for a stepparent adoption is that the biological father provides his consent to the adoption. If the biological father refuses to provide that consent the court can waive his consent and grant the adoption where it is shown that the biological father has legally abandoned the child to be adopted. The fact that the biological father has not paid child support in over 8 years and has not had physical contact with the child for over 3 years could be enough to establish the abandonment. Other factors of consideration would be the biological fathers other forms of contact with the child...


Q: 

I have one child and one on the way.. considering adoption

A: Hi, my name is Ashley. I just came across your post I noticed it is a few months old but if you are still considering adoption we would love to be considered. I have always been interested in adopting and now that we have had to miscarriages in the last 9 months and no children we are starting to take the steps to begin the adoption process. If you haven''t made your decision yet and would be interested in getting to know us please let me know. Thanks so much! lund_2006@hotmail.com hi my name is lindsey. i have been wanting to adopt a baby for a really long time. i have two kids of my own. aiden is 3 and elizar is 7 months. i was adopted as a baby also. i want to show a child that they are...


Q: 

adoption/ abanonment/ name change of minor

A: You would file a Petition for the change of name in the county court. Notice of the action would need to be served to the biological father and if he does not consent the court would have to make a finding that it would be in the best interest of the child for the name change to occur....


Q: 

adoption/ abanonment/ name change of minor

A: You would file a Petition for the change of name in the county court. Notice of the action would need to be served to the biological father and if he does not consent the court would have to make a finding that it would be in the best interest of the child for the name change to occur....


Q: 

If a pregnant woman signs adoption papers to give up her baby to a designated family, can she change her mind and keep it once the baby is born?

A: It''s happened before. I''m pretty sure you can, but it is going to get messy. Oh it''s not me… Someone else I know. I''m pretty sure it''s all up in the air until she hands over the kid…. @essieness: I didn''t think it was. ;) Yes, although the specific rules vary by state, with most states requiring at least two or three days waiting time between the birth of the child and the signing away of the birthmother''s rights. In some states, it''s even longer. In California, for example, the birthmother can take as long as she wants to sign over her rights! This means she can reclaim her child at any time before signing the papers- and it does happen. Oh- I also see this is in Texas- the relinquishment period in Texas is 60 days....


Q: 

Terminating parental rights? & adoption.

A: Here is a website that list the reason under AZ law that parental rights are terminated http://library.adoption.com/articles/grounds-for-termination-of-parental-rights-... If the court grants the request to terminal parental rights, yes you should be able to adopt the child after you marry the father....


Q: 

How to Recover from adoption Grief

A: Whether an adoption is opened or closed, birth parents lose their child to another family and another life. Birth parents experience the five stages of grief when losing a child to adoption, just as others do when they mourn the death of a loved one. Birth parents and birth families may try to cope with adoption grief by denying the existence of the child or avoiding close relationships. Recovering requires the birth mother and birth family to accept the birth and loss of that child and come to terms with the dramatic change in their lives.This process can be completed alone but may be more successful with support...


Q: 

Would adoption be the best answer?

A: there is lots of free help out there for single moms check into your local department of human services, or FIA,...they can ease some of the burden ur feeling....and only you can answer that, I guess the question I would ask if 10 years down the road would I regret giving him I think it would be really difficult for any of us to answer this question for you. I will say that I think unconditionally loving a child is the best thing anyone can do for a child. It''s not as important as having money, having older parents or having two parents. The fact that you''re considering giving him to a loving family who can give him a wonderful life tells me that you are probably capable of making your son feel loved and cherished. On the other hand, only...


Q: 

custody/adoption /california

A: Felica: DISCLAIMER: I AM NOT A LAWYER or ATTORNEY. I am someone who has experience with family law issues, and am sharing my OPINION only. For the exact law as it pertains to your specific case contact a Professional Attorney in your area/county. Most courts what Both MOM and DAD in picture.  Unless you kept some type of detailed log of when Dad was gone both prior and after he was notified your chances are slim, but possible. I would recommend "time" be your friend: Keep a detailed log book of events: Date/time/event/description. Say if DAD misses an appointment to pick child up, etc. then log it in your book. Do this for several months then take this log book along with your declaration similar to what you have stated above with the exception...


Q: 

step parent adoption/abandonment

A: Hi Gary, yes the adoption can be granted and the biological father"s consent can be waived if the court is convinced that the biological father has abandoned the child as that term is defined under chapter 63 of the Florida Statutes: (1) ?Abandoned? means a situation in which the parent or person having legal custody of a child, while being able, makes no provision for the child"s support and makes little or no effort to communicate with the child, which situation is sufficient to evince an intent to reject parental responsibilities. If, in the opinion of the court, the efforts of such parent or person having legal custody of the child to...


 
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