905.866 medical & health answers

Cervical spine lordosis answers (138)

Page 1 from 14 Next >
Q: 

Kyphosis cervical spine

A: hi claudia basically your spine is losing its natural curve. in "extreme cases" loss of cervical curve can cause paralysis- which would be seen to be beginning if you lost bladder or bowel control this is not how it normally goes though. you have no fractures of the vertebrae seen in advanced cases, so as long as you get some therapy you ought not to get to the loss of function stage. prognosis: "The majority of patient with kyphosis respond very well to a combination of physical therapy, exercises, and medications. Even in more severe cases that eventually require surgery, patients are able to return to normal activities without restrictions, in most cases, after they have fully recovered from surgery." that is quoted from...


Q: 

cervical spine advice requested

A: Hello - we are all patients just like you. I think you tried to post pictures and although some of us are familiar with films, a true read of them needs to be done by your treating doctor. But we can take your MRI text and explain it to our knowledge and experiences. I will break it down by paragraph and the response will follow each paragrah. Overall it looks like your condition is stable and not getting worse from the words they have written here. That is good! The question is - have your symptoms changed or worsened? The MRI is only one part of the picture. I am assuming you have had pain since you have a history of radiculopathy - is this under control or is it getting worse? That is pretty good news because there are some of who the bone spurs grow very fast and even within a year...


Q: 

Mri cervical spine

A: Dear Dennis, The cervical vertebral bodies are intact with a slight reverse lordosis and minimal marginal endplate spondylosis c5-c6 and c6-c7:  The curve in your neck has changed to the opposite direction (reversed lordosis).  Additionally, there are minimal degenerative changes to the top and bottom surfaces of the vertebra. At c6-c7 there is a tiny posterior midline disc herniation and annular tear effacing the ventral thecal sac:  the disk is made of two separate tissue types.  The outside is fibrous and tough, the inside is more gelatinous.  So the outside of the disk has been torn and is bulging rearward into the covering of the spinal cord. The central canal is...


Q: 

cervical spine deterioration

A: just wondering if you have obtained more than just one opinion on your situation? i too had some very very scarey stuff going on at the cord level with three seperate neurosurgeons giving all kinds of differing views on just what this ment for me risk wise and what could be done. you just need to be seeking out the most experienced type of neurosurgeons who deal with compression and whever else is going on up there. just what does your MRI state about the hard findings in that summary at the very end? trust me when i say that not all neurosurgeons are created equal. not by a long shot. what any NS tells you about being able to actually fix something is kind of set by many ways by his or her own training,experience and limitations. other NSs may see your case very differently. i cannot...


Q: 

cervical spine

A: Kara, Thanks for your question. A 117-degree loss of the cervical lordosis would indicate a reversal of the lordotic curvature of the neck, called a cervical kyphosis. That"s a rather significant loss of the normal curvature. In some cases, a dramatic loss of the cervical curvature may produce pressure against the spinal cord, resulting in neurological symptoms. More commonly, such a loss of the cervical lordosis results in degenerative joint and disc changes (osteoarthritis) which in itself is painful and chronic. Generally, surgical intervention is considered when a person has severe, unremitting pain that is unresponsive to...


Q: 

Reverse lordosis of the cervical spine

A: Although I"m not a physician, I can tell you that lordosis  is a medical term used to describe an inward curvature of a portion of the vertebral column. Two segments of the vertebral column, namely cervical (neck) and lumbar (lower back), are normally lordotic.  That means they are set in a curve that has its convex side to the front and the concave side to the rear. Apparently, your son has curvature going in the opposite direction, resulting in pain. Thank you for your question, Roni.  I hope that my answer was helpful....


Q: 

neuropathy due to cervical spine injury-surgery

A: Hello Oldncold I have cervical injury which you can read in my signature. I also suffer with polyneuropathy and this has been diagnosed through an EMG. But I did have my neck injury over ten years ago, and didn''t have insurance at that time to see a neurosurgeon and neurologist. I was diagnosed with polyneuropathy several months ago as well as Diabetes, so I do not know if their is a connection. I am sorry that you also suffer with this neuropathy. Jeanne _____________________ ~LUMBAR~ Posterolateral Fusion & Infuse with Laminectomy & Discectomy on L4,L5,S1 June 2003 Instrumentation = 2 Rods, 6 Screws, 2 Disc Spacers FBSS-Failed Back Surgery Syndrome ~cervical~ Straightening of the Normal cervical

Q: 

cervical spine pain:Headaches

A: Hi, Shelia, All those disc bulges and changes of spinal curvature point to one thing:  muscular contractions. Did your practitioners check for that? There are three major categories of headache.  I describe them in my article on headaches at somatics.com/page4b.htm It will answer a lot of questions, including what to do. with regard, Lawrence Gold...


Q: 

cervical spine

A: Hi arlene, You did not clarify whether you have been under treatment for these 19 months.  You should consult a Chiropractic doctor about this directly before it becomes more chronic.  If you have been under treatment, go to different doctor of Chiropractic an opinion.   You are getting neurological involvement and should not allow it to get worse without further investigation. You may have some arthritic changes that are compromising the nerves.  While this may not be curable, you should get some relief.  At worst the problem should stabilize and not degenerate. Hopefully, you have been shown stretching and strengthening exercises as well as ideas on daily activities to work toward stabilization. There are a lot of good sites that will help with...


Q: 

cervical spine

A: Hello Jogesh,   You may want to have a consultation with a orthopedic surgeon.  The C5-C6 impingement on the nerves is the cause your symptoms.  If your symptoms continue to worsen, loss of muscle strength, numbness, etc. surgery may be necessary to relieve pressure on the nerves to prevent possible permanent nerve damage.  Often the surgery is quick and simple, they can make a small incision and basically clean up/increase the size of the foramen for the exiting nerves.     Acupuncture may help with the pain but will not take pressure off the nerves. Have a great day, Dr. Brendon O"Brien D.C....


 
Contact us   |   Disclaimer & Privacy Policy   |