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Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia answers (48)

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Q: 

What Is Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia?

A: Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, or VIN, is a precancerous skin condition which affects the vulva. This condition is not cancerous, but vulvar cancer may develop if it is not treated. Many women with VIN experience symptoms such as vulvar pain, but sometimes the disease is asymptomatic. Once the condition has been diagnosed, women with VIN have several treatment options, including surgery and topical chemotherapy. Vulvar cancer represents around 1% of cancers that affect women only, and approximately 4% of cancers that affect the female reproductive organs. In fact, it is more common for a woman to have an abnormal Pap smear than it is for her to be diagnosed with a vulvar condition. Vulvar intraepithelial
Q: 

Is it possible to have cervical cancer and have a normal pap? If so what symptoms should one look for and/or test should be requested?

A: Pap smear has a sensitivity around 50 %. So, half of people with cervical cancer will be missed: the test comes back normal, and yet cervical cancer may be there. Human Papilloma virus DNA (HPV DNA) testing is mucht more sensitive, but adequate tests may not yet easily be available. Earkly symptoms are vaginal discharge, beeding and pain. Early here means first symptoms; it does not mean early, because these symptoms usually appear after the cancer has been growing for a while. Apart from the problem of low sensitivity, classic pap testing has beeen criticized for it resulting in many false-positives. That is: many pap smears wil come back as abnormal, warranting further examination, while in the end nothing comes out. HPV vaccination is...


Q: 

What Is The Proper Care Of A Low Grade Squamous intraepithelial Lesion?

A: Usually low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion goes away on its own, within a period of two years. Treatment is not required. But if it stays or grow in size then it is removed by procedures such as loop electrical excision procedure, cryosurgery, cone biopsy or laser ablation. LGSIL usually indicates mild cervical dysplasia (CIN 1) caused by human papilloma virus infection. This common and benign form of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia usually resolves sponteneously within 2 years. If it progresses, treatment is necessary which involves removal of the affected tissue. Diet rich in fruits and vegetables helps cure. Proper care of a low grade squamous

Q: 

What Is The Proper Care Of A Low Grade Squamous intraepithelial Lesion?

A: Usually low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion goes away on its own, within a period of two years. Treatment is not required. But if it stays or grow in size then it is removed by procedures such as loop electrical excision procedure, cryosurgery, cone biopsy or laser ablation. LGSIL usually indicates mild cervical dysplasia (CIN 1) caused by human papilloma virus infection. This common and benign form of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia usually resolves sponteneously within 2 years. If it progresses, treatment is necessary which involves removal of the affected tissue. Diet rich in fruits and vegetables helps cure. Proper care of a low grade squamous

Q: 

Do they use cryotherapy for cervical cancer?

A: No, not for cervical cancer. Cryotherapy is a treatment used for abnormal cells on the surface of the neck of the womb (the cervix). Your doctor may say you have ''CIN''. This is not actually cervical cancer, but a pre-cancerous condition usually diagnosed after a routine cervical smear (PAP smear). CIN stands for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia which means the skin cells on the surface of the cervix are slightly abnormal. If not treated, then CIN may go on to develop into cervical cancer. Doctors also sometimes use cryotherapy to treat non cancerous conditions of the cervix, for example, for inflammation or
Q: 

What Is a cervical Neoplasm?

A: Neoplasm is a term generally used to refer to an abnormal growth, or tumor, and a cervical neoplasm is an abnormal growth occurring in the cervix. The cervix forms the entrance to the womb and is located at the upper end of the vagina. A number of different types of neoplasm may develop in the cervix, most of which are benign, or non-cancerous, but some have the potential to develop into cancer. Neoplastic cells may be detected during what is called a Pap, or smear, test. Only a small proportion of cases of cervical neoplasm are found to be cancer.. Cells in the cervix may go through a number of abnormal pre-cancerous changes. When abnormal cells are found, the condition is graded according to the thickness of the surface of the cervix...


Q: 

does having cervical pre cancer means i have hpv?

A: Hello,A virus-the human papillomavirus, or HPV causes almost all cases of cervical cancer. They also are the causeof their immediate precursor, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3), a precancerous condition. Ihope it helps.Take care and regards.You can get more information about this from the following site: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/risk/hpv-cervical...
Q: 

How common is LSIL cervical dysplasia?

A: LSIL (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) cervical dysplasia, also known as CIN I (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia), is the mildest form of abnormal cervical-cell growth. A 2010 American Society for Colposcopy and cervical Pathology study found CIN I in 1.6 per 1,000 U.S. women.Source:The American Society for Colposcopy and cervical Pathology: Incidence and Costs of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia...


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HPV infection: How does it cause cervical cancer?

A: Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) — a sexually transmitted infection — is the most common cause of cervical cancer. When a woman is exposed to HPV, her immune system usually prevents the virus from doing any serious harm. But in a small number of women, the virus survives for years. Eventually, the virus can lead to the conversion of normal cells on the surface of the cervix into cancerous cells. At first, the cells may only show signs of a viral infection. Eventually, however, the cells may develop precancerous changes. This is known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Typically, the precancerous changes clear spontaneously. In some cases, however — particularly for...


Q: 

cervical cancer - adenocarcinoma

A: any cancer jump as you said to lymph nodes we call this metastasis and invasion, it is available for the type of cancer that you had or any other cancer. usually we use a staging for an evaluation including a preoperatory staging [ct or MRI] and a post operatory staging with exploration, if it did spread around in the lymph nodes the surgeon can feel it, or see it but sometimes the size of the tumor is so small that it can not be seen, but the pathology will tell more about it and usually you wait 15 days to know the final results. Following the surgery depending on the staging but in you case I think a chemotherapy might be needed to make sure that every tumoral cells are killed. After any cancer there is recurrences meaning the cancer either can come back or the small cells that...
 
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