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Central disc herniation answers
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Central disc herniation answers (423)

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Q: 

What is degenerative disc disease L5-s1 with small central disc herniation?

A: Answer DDD is the wearing down of the disks that are located between each of the vertebra in your back. this occurs when the fluid in the disks diminishes often due to old age or injury. The fluid helps to absorb shock and without it they rub together and cause the disks to wear away. Together it would mean the wearing down of the disks between the 5th lumbar vertabra to the 1st sacral vertabre with a small hernia in the central disk. this would be a total of six disks. Hope this helps...


Q: 

disc herniations

A: Motor Vehicle Accident, Automobile accident, car crash, auto accident, car accident, staten island car accident, disc herniation, staten island automobile accident, disk herniation, whiplash, staten island disc herniation, HNP, staten island pain management, disc degeneration, degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis, staten island motor vehicle accident Hello Cheryl, I am sorry to hear of your motor vehicle accident (MVA). I am sorry to hear of your accident and the resulting aches, pains, conditions. Well, you are in the right place!  At the Chiropractic section of AllExperts.com we handle car accident patients all day,...


Q: 

anterior disc herniation

A: Anelie, It is generally believed that anterior disc herniation is not a problem since there is no direct impingement of neural tissue.  But, tell that to the person with lower back pain...  We do not always know the cause of back pain.  There are cases where the MRI shows evidence of disc herniation that abuts a nerve root, but the patient has no pain or there is pain on the opposite side (e.g. a left nerve root irritation causes left sided back and sciatic pain).  So while your pain may or may not have anything to do with the disc herniation, the bottom line regarding whether you need to have surgery is whether you...


Q: 

What Is A Paracentral And Lateral disc herniation And Annular Tear?

A: It means you have a slipped disc, or disc herniation. The fluid-filled portion of your disc has ruptured and some of the material is now impinging on your spinal cord. para central and lateral disc herniation are the sticking out of cartilages between cervical vertebrae. cervical vertebrae is slightly bulged in these cases. more care should be given if there is injured. An annular tear is the break in the annular fibrous which is a hole or rip in the outer disc wall...


Q: 

What Is A Paracentral And Lateral disc herniation And Annular Tear?

A: para central and lateral disc herniation are the sticking out of cartilages between cervical vertebrae. cervical vertebrae is slightly bulged in these cases. more care should be given if there is injured. An annular tear is the break in the annular fibrous which is a hole or rip in the outer disc wall...


Q: 

What does it mean that back disc spaces ere unremarkable for disc herniation

A: central canal stenosis as well as lateral foraminal stenosis is used to refer to the closing of the space through which the spinal cord and spinal nerves pass respectively. Stenosis is the closing of a hole through which a nerve passes. Desiccation is the act of drying. Therefore your L4/5 lumbar disc is drying out and probably has a lack of blood supply. The anterior spondylolisthesis is slipping of one vertebra forward on top of another so they don't stack straight up like they should. Conservative therapy is typically best in these situations and bracing may be required. It sounds like you have a slight disc herniation, probably due to the spondylolisthesis, which is causing a
Q: 

L5 disc herniation

A: Unfortunately, with a herniation that large, your only recourse may be a surgery.  They may try a round of physical therapy to see if it helps; it probably won"t unless you luck upon a practitioner of the McKenzie method.  This may or may not help with a herniation of that extent.  If you can find one in your area ( a google search for the McKenzie institute will take you to their site, and their practitioners are listed in a directory), you may want to give it a try before anything less conservative....


Q: 

disc herniation

A: Dear Sharmin, The obvious question here is to ask, Have you tried chiropractic?  If not then why?  I see these cases in my office all the time, and most never need surgical correction. Often acute disk injury/bulges are pretty easy to treat.  You calm the local inflammation down with electrical stimulation and ice, and then adjust the spine manually, with a drop table, or a cox flexion table, and some mild stretching techniques, the pain reduces in just a few visits.  I often have people who couldn"t walk without being bent over, almost pain free in as little as 2-3 weeks.  And if they are a more stubborn case, I might have them placed on an intervertebral disk decompression machine.  Obviously these patients need physical rehab as well to work on spinal...


Q: 

What is the difference between Cervical disc herniation and Cervical disc Encroa

A: CERVICAL disc herniation:- Cervical herniated discs less common than lumbar herniated discs Cervical disc herniations are far less common than lumbar disc herniations for two reasons: There is far less disc material in the cervical spine There is substantially less force across the cervical spine When they do occur, most cervical disc herniations will extrude out to the side of the spinal canal and impinge on the exiting nerve root at the lower level If the space for the nerve root (foramen) is already compromised...
Q: 

Multilevel disc herniation"s with encroachment onto the central canal.

A: Hi Mon, Because I"m not a doctor I"ll leave all of the technical stuff to them. But yes it could be that serious. He does need to see a neurologist asap. Whether a few weeks matters or not, only a qualified neurologist could answer that. I know a doctor in Wisconsin who may be able to give you an answer to your questions. His name is Dr. Cully White at 2901 W KK River Pkwy # 201   Milwaukee, WI 53215-3660 (414) 649-3924 I will keep good thoughts for you and your father. And I hope this helps, sincerely, Ken...


 
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