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Q: 

Back in February of this year I felt a lump at the 9 o''clock position on my right breast and also noticed nipple discharge (clear, sticky fluid which crystalized and looked goldenish brown). I immediately followed up with my doctor and was referred to a breast surgeon. Mammogram and ultrasounds were done. I found out I have dense breasts which reduces sensitivity to mammo/ultraound. The mammo confirmed the mass, but the ultrasound did not pick it up. Nothing showed up for the nipple discharge on both tests. The recommendation was FNAB for the mass. This was done and the pathologist report stated fibroadenoma. Upon discussing with my breast surgeon I have the mass removed surgically in May of 2008. Although I had pointed out the discharge my surgeon did not feel surgery was needed for this at the time. After surgery I still noticed the discharge which happened when I lay on my right side (stains on my nightclothes) or pressed up by my bra or when it was stimulated. I returned in November to my breast surgeon as this was worrying me. I was sent for a ductogram at another center. Mammo and ultrasound were conducted which showed nothing just as my initial mammo and ultrasounds had. The ductogram was then done the same day (which was very uncomfortable)during the mammo there was blood coming from the nipple (I assume due to the stress of it being compressed a second time). The results of the ductogram stated:after cleansing the nipple with alcohol, a tiny block of golden fluid was elicited from a duct in the lower pole of the nipple. Ninety-degree lateral and CC spot compression magnification views demonstrate several irregular filling defects within a duct in the central breast, approximately 4.5 cm from the nipple, as well as a cut-off sign representing a second lesion in a branching duct. There is poor filling of the ducts between these lesions and the nipple, and additional lessions cannot be exluded. Duct excision is recommended to distinguish betwen papillomas and papillary carcinomas. My breast surgeon and the radiologist both told me that this may likely be papilloma and that the only way to know is through excision. The radiologist suggested removing it as the discharge will only increase and it will be uncomfortable for me. My breast surgeon stated that all the ducts must be removed because if it is papilloma it will spread to other ducts. I am greatly concerned as I turned 35 this month and am concerned about my ability to breast feed if and when I become pregnant. I do not have a family history of breast cancer, I don''t drink alcohol nor have I ever smoked. I have scheduled surgery for 1/9/09. I am very worried over all of this as I feel that this situation if it were looked at when I pointed it out back in February could have been dealt with then. This is so horrifying. Might I add since having the mammogram, ductogram with mammogram on 12/19/08 the bleeding comes every now and again. While I am being brave for this procedure I am worried and also concerned if there is anyway any ducts could be left intact.Thanks for your response in advance.

A: bloody nipple discharge is a condition that warrants investigation as to its cause and treatment for those findings. papillomas are a common cause and are to be surgically removed. hopefully it won''t be cancer. focus on treating what you have now and not possible breast feeding in the future. the breast, with just one duct removed will still likely produce milk and your remaining breast of course will make up for volume....
Q: 

I''d prefer not to have chemotherapy (rectocele, varicose, bad veins in general) or radiotherapy (autoimmune disorder in the vascular collegen category-antiphospholipid syndrome). I''ll take Arimidex. I just turned 50, have had 1 period in two years (last august). My 1.8ct tumor was removed with clean margins of 7mm, node negative, 40% ER positive, 83% PR positive, Her2-neu negative. So far, so good. It was a stage 3 cancer, though, 8 out of 9, Ki-67 at 23. Oncologist gave me an 84% non-recurrance statistic with no additional treatment, with hormonal therapy adding 4% and chemo only 2%. In the 3 months since diagnosis, I''ve lost 37 of the 75 pounds I need to lose. I''m eating whole foods, nothing processed, no sugar, alcohol, etc. Taking lots of supplements. I feel GREAT! I feel in control! I think I''d worry more about the possible now and later effects of chemo and RT in my case, than I would about a possible recurrence of cancer. Am I foolish to opt for an 88% chance of non-recurrance? Do you agree with those statistics?

A: that''s a pretty high number to be quoted considering not doing additional traditional treatment. the risk of recurrence in the breast alone without radiation, based on published studies is 40% within 2 years. the rule is if you opt for lumpectomy you are also committing to doing radiation. so go for a second opinion about all of this. don''t want you to have a false sense of security and be bit by the dog sooner vs later....
Q: 

going through alcohol withdrawal

A: It might be a good investment to buy a blood pressure monitor. My husband just bought me one and it gives your pulse, and it shows it you have an irregular heart beat. Sometimes you may feel as if your heart beat is irregular but it may very well not be. It may give you some reassurance. If your heart is racing, it is probley normal for you due to anxiety. Just remember that it will go back down. When I feel real anxious, I am unable to check my heartrate because I am scared to death. But through out the day when I feel okay, I monitor it all and it sort of brings some reassurance. When my heart pounds, I feel like I have no enegy and its hard just to take a breath. I know it is scary feeling, I hope you will feel better. Mabye go online and read about positive thinking. Mabye it will...


Q: 

What is an alcohol evaluation?

A: An alcohol evaluation is a screening tool designed to reveal whether or not a person is engaging in harmful or risky drinking.FunctionAn alcohol evaluation is designed to detect drinking problems early on so that you can receive treatment at the beginning of the addiction process....


Q: 

bipolar,Vicodin,and alcohol

A: Hi Donna . . . People with bipolar disorder are seldom a risk to their friends or relatives. This changes dramatically when narcotics and/or alcohol enter the picture. People with bipolar disorder who use or abuse narcotics and/or alcohol are very unpredictable and are capable of aggressive acts that can be VERY dangerous. While you boyfriend"s doctor cannot discuss your boyfriend"s treatment with you, he/she should take seriously what you have to say about your boyfriend"s behavior. It would probably also be useful to point out to the doctor that you will "hold him/her responsible" for anything your boyfriend does when taking the Vicodin. It would also be useful for you to explore substance abuse programs from which your boyfriend can get help and it...


Q: 

Will overweight, diabetic, chain smoking, alcoholics on motorcycles now be covered by our insurance companies?

A: Well gosh, you were already paying for their health care when they showed up in ER''s critically ill and in need of care. Expensive care at that. Do you think that because they were uninsured hospitals and other care providers said to themselves, ''Gosh we''ll just absorb the cost of the treatment we gave that uninsured person!'' No they did not. They spread that cost around in the form of higher prices for those what were insured in order to pay for that care. Eventually the ''overweight, diabetic, chain smoking, alcoholics'' will be able to get preventive care making it less likely that they will be overweight, chain smoking, diabetic alcoholics. This will decrease the likelihood of expensive emergency care that you have to pay for....


Q: 

How long should you abstain from alcohol with mononucleosis hepatitis?

A: Hepatitis is the general term for inflammation of the liver and can be caused by a variety of factors, including mononucleosis. Hepatitis caused by mononucleosis is quite common and, like the illness itself, generally resolves without treatment or complications. However, the liver may remain vulnerable to irritation by other agents, including alcohol. For those with mononucleosis-induced hepatitis, patients are advised to refrain from any alcohol use for up to one year....


Q: 

What are some treatments for alcoholics?

A: The standard of care is 1) detoxification, usually for 3-4 days, followed by 2) relapse prevention groups (or in the more severe cases, residential treatment), and 3) self-help group support, such as AA and others, plus 4) individual counseling....


Q: 

Can you have an alcohol prep for a colonoscopy?

A: An alcohol prep is the sterilization of skin to prepare for an injection, blood withdrawal, suturing or intravenous treatments. A colonoscopy preparation is the cleansing of the large intestine with some form of laxative. The alcohol prep is used only for intravenous anesthesia for a colonoscopy.References:National Digestive Diseases Information: Colonoscopy...


Q: 

  Hi, I am 30 years old. I was diagnosed with GERD in 2003. Taking Nexium 40mg/day. I had an endoscopy done in ''04. Dr. said that I had some scaring but nothing terrible. Between 2004-2007, I would go out and drink alcohol with friendson a weekend nig

A: Dear bonicchevy, I would strongly want you to go for present day upper gastrointestinal endoscopy tounderstand the damage to your upper esophagus due to GERD and also to see if there is any damage to stomach orupper duodenum. I would also want you to check for H.Pylori infection and if you have any peptic ulcer. Longstanding severe GERD causes changes in the cells that line the esophagus in some people. These cells are precancerous and finally become cancerous (Barret?s esophagus). The acid perfusion (Bernstein) test is used todetermine if chest pain is caused by acid reflux. If the chest pain is not due to the acid then you have to gofor a cardiologist to rule out any cardiovascular conditions. I would suggest you to maintain a normal BMI andto go for regular exercise and to maintain a...


 
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